Report: Toyota confirmed to be exploring forced induction for GT86 mid-cycle refresh, hybrid possible too
Gallery - 11 images
  • 2013 Toyota FT-86 Open Concept Front 3-4 Left
  • 2013 Toyota FT-86 Open Concept Rear 3-4 Left
  • 2013 Toyota FT-86 Open Concept Rear 3-4 Right Cruising
  • 2013 Toyota FT-86 Open Concept Rear 7-8 Right
  • 2013 Toyota FT-86 Open Concept Interior
  • 2013 Toyota FT-86 Open Concept Interior Driver Seat
  • 2013 Toyota FT-86 Open Concept Interior Front
  • 2013 Toyota FT-86 Open Concept
  • 2013 Toyota FT-86 Open Concept Front 3-4 Left Coastal Cruising
  • 2013 Toyota FT-86 Open Concept Front 3-4 Left Cruising
  • 2013 Toyota FT-86 Open Concept Rear 3-4 Left Cruising

AutoCarUK has learned that Toyota has confirmed to be considering turbocharged and supercharged versions of its well-received GT86 sports car. Heck, they might even introduce a high-performance hybrid variant as well.

Click here for our original post on the 2013 Toyota FT86 Open Concept.

“I’ve been asked a lot about a turbocharging,” Tada said to AutoCarUK. “We are already working on a mid-life facelift for the car, and we are investigating both turbocharging and supercharging too. But an electric motor assistance solution is also possible, and would bring benefits that forced induction does not.”

Interestingly enough, Tada said that Toyota’s upper management were very skeptical about the GT86’s success and “considered it very risky.” They wanted sure on proof that the coupe would hit its sales target, even before the unveiling of the droptop GT86 Concept. Now, Tada happily reports that upper management has thoroughly been convinced, hence the FT86 Open Concept.

That said, now that a convertible version has received the right amount of approval, Tada said that Toyota is now willing to expand, hence the exploration of more powerful variants of the GT86.

The management considered the GT86 very risky,” Tada elaborated to AutoCarUK. “They wanted proof that the ’86 coupe would hit its sales targets before they would sign off on a convertible.

“Now that they have that proof, we can begin to think about other development ideas for the car. But we must guard against compromising any of the key virtues of the standard GT86 in the pursuit of more power.”

No word on how this could affect the GT86’s other siblings, the Scion FR-S and the Subaru BR-Z.

- By: Chris Chin

Source: AutoCarUK


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  • cad4life

    they should have had a turbo option from the start, 4 update problem fords putting put a turbo 4 in the stang and u know it will have more power than the frs turbo plus probably cheaper, Toyota screw up from start with this car, cost 2 much, not enough power, back seat useless, etc, etc

  • Super Nerd

    In your own mind it’s not perfect. About the back seats, it’s a sports coupe. Don’t expect a car like that to have legroom like a corolla. Does an Audi TT have a good amount of legroom or a Porsche 911? No it doesn’t. The Toyota 86 is a huge success. Absolute fun car to drive. Straight line performance is not it’s strength. It’s the handling. It will only get better and better. If Toyota really screwed up this car. Why is the car selling so well?