Report: Toyota hybrids are increasing in popularity in diesel-happy Europe
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Jeremy Clarkson would have a hissy fit if he ever found out about this. AutomotiveNews Europe reports that Toyota’s hybrid models gaining popularity throughout diesel-happy Europe. Annual sales of Toyota and Lexus hybrids have reportedly topped the 100,000 mark for the first time last year. That is a 29% increase from 2011.

And I find this rather interesting because it’s almost as if our automotive markets are ass-backwards in these aspects. I say this because out here in a America, we are yearning for more diesel passenger vehicles, though for various reasons known, and unknown, they’re still off to a slow start. And yet, Europe is all diesel happy and has been for decades.

But interestingly enough, over in Europe, they don’t exactly have as much space we do here on the big ‘ol continent of North America—which is part of the reason for our association with “bigger is better.” That said, diesels make more sense here because we naturally have more land to travel and in many cases, longer commutes in terms of distance rather than actual traffic time. In other words, it’s hard to doubt that everything here in the US of A is far more spread out than it is in Europe.

And yet, due to the increase and crack down on automotive congestion—just look at the highly strung United Kingdom—not to mention their densely populated cities, it’s almost as if hybrids make more sense in Europe than they do here in America. I mean, in essence, hybrids should technically be more plentiful in Europe due to their frugality—and as much as I hate to say it, they do make sense when sitting in traffic is a daily routine. And it seems the European lot is catching on.

- By: Chris Chin

Source: AutomotiveNews Europe


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  • cad4life

    I guess this is why bmw called Toyota, their don’t want lexus 2 take sale from them in their own backyard