U.S. DOT says traffic fatalities fell to lowest level in 2010 since 1949

United States Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood and President Barack Obama
United States Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood and President Barack Obama

U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood announced today that the number and rate of traffic fatalities in 2010 fell to the lowest levels since 1949, despite a significant increase in the number of miles Americans were driving during the year.

“Last year’s drop in traffic fatalities is welcome news and it proves that we can make a difference,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. “Still, too many of our friends and neighbors are killed in preventable roadway tragedies every day. We will continue doing everything possible to make cars safer, increase seat belt use, put a stop to drunk driving and distracted driving and encourage drivers to put safety first.”

The NHTSA said that the number of traffic fatalities fell three percent between 2009 and 2010, from 33,808 to 32,788. Since 2005, fatalities have dropped 25 percent, from a total of 43,510 fatalities in 2005.

Congratulations to the Pacific Northwest states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Alaska, where fatalities dropped by 12 percent

“The decrease in traffic fatalities is a good sign, but we are always working to save lives,” said NHTSA Administrator David Strickland. “NHTSA will continue pressing forward on all of our safety initiatives to make sure our roads are as safe as they can possibly be.”

– By: Omar Rana