Elon Musk

Around the 2011 Detroit Auto Show, Tesla confirmed production of the Model S electric sedan is scheduled to begin in mid-2012 at the Tesla Factory in Fremont, CA. Tesla said it already has 3,500 reservations for the Model S. However, the electric automaker has no plans to stop there.

At the Cleantech Investor Summit in Palm Springs, California on Wednesday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk once again confirmed that Tesla will unveil the Model X SUV later this year followed by an affordable electric sedan that will cost around $30,000. It was previously reported the Model X SUV will arrive some time in 2014 and will share a similar powertrain that is found in the Model S. The affordable electric-sedan will be similar in size to the BMW 3-Series and will arrive sometime in 2015. Along with the Model X SUV and the 3-Series-sized electric sedan, total annual production output for Tesla is expected to rise between 30,000 and 40,000 units a year.

What’s interesting is that Musk has some pretty aggressive predictions for the future of electric-vehicles. Musk says that by 2020, it will be dirt cheap to have long range vehicle battery packs and that by 2030 the only cars sold in America will be electric-car. By mid-century, Musk says that the vast majority of cars on the roads will be electric.

We’ll see what happens but for now we think those are some far-fetched predictions.

- By: Omar Rana

Source: GigaOm


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  • Ramon h leigh

    Everyone knows that the ONLY reason gasoline was ever used to power cars was due to the absence on a practical electric battery before WWI. The Model S may not prove that batteries are quite yet cheap enough to invade the lower cost strata of the auto market, but they provide undeniable evidence that battery packs are fully capable of competing in terms of long distance driving (with 350 mile ranges and 1 hour recharge times) and are superior to ICE powered vehicles in all other respects – faster, cleaner, cheaper to operate, cheaper to maintain, more reliable, with far better handling and driveability and far more usable space
    in the same dimension vehicle. Nice things happen when you toss away a couple thousand
    unnecessary parts and provide elegant engineering.

  • Ramonhleigh

    As for Elon’s prediction of the future of the auto, considering the rate and sheer number of very promising (and last week, very real) advances in the practicality of the electric battery, I’d
    say it’s a slam dunk that there will be no ICE powered vehicles in production by 2020.
    Personally I think they will disappear before then.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_A5FGBUGV6ONZW7BFBRHCGHSO2E TonyG

    paydirt on battery tech will made electric cars undeniable.

  • http://www.facebook.com/saneblane Kimma Matthews

    thank you tesla motors.you guys are thinking out of the box and making a few of the big three manufacturers nervous. with gm releasing the volt and nissan leaf, now sold out. it’s clear that electric is due for a liftoff

  • Cdnsolman

    Electric cars may be what’s coming, but just like gasoline prices spiked when ICE cars used too much fuel, what do you think is going to happen to electriciy. And that effects those who don’t drive electric cars. And conveniently that will also mean that fuel will be cheaper for those of us who will still be driving cars with engines instead of motors.
    Plus with the amount of coal used for electricity, it will not be an environmental savings, just a political one.

  • dish

    I think he is right when you consider rising gas prices, especially those in Europe. England is over 5 pounds per gallon and expecting to hit 8 this summer. Just imagine what where prices will go 5, 10, 15 years from now. If you put out an EV that cost 10 grand about a gas vehicle it will pay for it self in 1 – 2 years- that will be the reality in the next 2 – 3 years. People will see this as an absolute necessity for their survival. Demand from places like China and India are only going to go up. It’s hard to imagine prices trending anywhere but up from here on.

  • dish

    I think he is right when you consider rising gas prices, especially those in Europe. England is over 5 pounds per gallon and expecting to hit 8 this summer. Just imagine what where prices will go 5, 10, 15 years from now. If you put out an EV that cost 10 grand about a gas vehicle it will pay for it self in 1 – 2 years- that will be the reality in the next 2 – 3 years. People will see this as an absolute necessity for their survival. Demand from places like China and India are only going to go up. It’s hard to imagine prices trending anywhere but up from here on.

  • dish

    Yes if you assume inovation stops after EV. I think the next progression is solar power.

  • http://solarchargeddriving.com Anonymous

    The plausibility of Musk’s prediction depends on how you define electric car: If you include plug-in hybrids like the Volt as “electric,” an all-electric fleet by 2030 is perfectly plausible.

  • Lawrence Rhodes….

    The volt is a hybrid and not all electric. It’s all about the charging time. Not range. Range isn’t that important if it takes two days to charge. Better to have 60 miles range and 10 minute charge.

  • Lawrence Rhodes…..

    The next horizon is zero point and anti gravity…….Way off for us but the government has had it for a long time

  • Guest

    If you do a little research first, you’d discover two things. First, the excess electricity generation at night can power something like 75% of all of the miles we Americans currently drive. This energy is currently thrown away because there’s no way to store it. Second, even if an EV uses 100% coal, it is cleaner than a gasoline car. This is because the electric car is 3x more efficient than the gas car with that energy, so it uses 1/3 as much. See also the EPA sticker for the Leaf: 99MPG equivolent…

  • Guest

    If you do a little research first, you’d discover two things. First, the excess electricity generation at night can power something like 75% of all of the miles we Americans currently drive. This energy is currently thrown away because there’s no way to store it. Second, even if an EV uses 100% coal, it is cleaner than a gasoline car. This is because the electric car is 3x more efficient than the gas car with that energy, so it uses 1/3 as much. See also the EPA sticker for the Leaf: 99MPG equivolent…

  • Redstone18

    Electric cars will be inherently cheaper since its drivetrain has ONE TENTH the parts of an ICE drivetrain. No transmission, fuel delivery system, exhaust, simpler cooling, etc.

    Batteries are also inherently cheap when volumes come up. I hear there is only a few pounds of lithium in a car battery.

  • Redstone18

    Electric cars will be inherently cheaper since its drivetrain has ONE TENTH the parts of an ICE drivetrain. No transmission, fuel delivery system, exhaust, simpler cooling, etc.

    Batteries are also inherently cheap when volumes come up. I hear there is only a few pounds of lithium in a car battery.

  • Al Hook

    Tesla are powered with laptop etc batteries produced in billions.

    Can hardly label this anything but mass production.

  • Tblakeslee

    Yes its mass production but a poor match for the application so there is a lot of waste adapting these tiny batteries into massive assemblys.

  • me

    until we find i way to generate electricity on a scale that fossil fuels can, and way more will be needed in the near future, it wont help one bit in reducing the use of fossil fuels,